Tag Archives: creativity

This genius class 9th dropout scrap dealer’s son can turn scrap / leftover tech parts into a computer.

With enough practice and a good DIY guide, anyone can ‘assemble’ a computer from new parts. But Jayant Parab has fashioned it from parts salvaged from e-waste, and cut the acrylic body himself. He got the know how of repairing computers from his elder brother, who repairs computers.

The 16-year-old, Jayant Parab from Mumbai is comfortable in the solitude of his Ghatkopar house, consumed by his 9-inch computer that he has made from scrap.

“I want to make affordable computers. The computer I have made is from leftovers from offices, banks and hospitals,” he says, pointing to his invention. “The screen is similar to one seen in operation theatres. It’s not a real computer. I used bits and pieces from here and there, and acrylic for the body, which I cut myself. What you see is the first step towards achieving my dream,” says Jayant.

Scrap dealer Ravindra Parab, Jayant’s father who set him on this path | Image Credit: Midday

Jayant had set out on actualising this dream much earlier. As a child, he accompanied his father, then a small-time scrap dealer, in collecting ‘waste’. “He picked up things he thought he could use at home. In Std V, he repaired a laptop that an office had disposed of. That was the time I sort of knew that he would end up in the field of computers,” Ravindra Parab, his father.

Today, Ravindra collects scrap — old and unusable computers, other hardwares from offices, hospitals and schools. “This is how e-waste is generated. Some I sell, some I give for recycling and others I hand over to my son,” says Ravindra, looking fondly at Jayant.

The youngster says the e-waste he gets is usually “as bad as it could get”. “But I try to modify it, by adding new parts and wires. So, it becomes as good as new. If nothing, such computers can be used by families and students who can’t afford to buy a regular one,” claims Jayant.

“He had no interest in studies and that pained me,” says his father. But he was impressed with his son’s vision.

I want to ultimately revolutionise the e-waste industry,” says Jayant. The kid hasn’t given up on education entirely, pursuing Std X via correspondence, while dabbling in ethical hacking and security systems.

India Is Also The Fifth Largest E-Waste Producer!

This village is producing electricity in a mud pot with the Cow-dung and discarded battery cells. Here’s how?

You would have heard of Bio-gas plant, but here’s a totally different story.

This story is of village Poorejham Tiwari located on the Sultanpur road 5 kms. from Haidergarh town in Barabanki of Uttar Pradesh.

Brijesh Tripathi, a young farmer in village Poorejham, who is just intermediate passed out has invented this new way of producing electricity in a mud pot with cow-dung and discarded battery cells.

He takes cheap Chinese bulbs used in electric welts, and 3 discarded battery cells. He replaces the cover of those discarded cells and connects the positive and negative wires to it and then dip then in three mud pots filled with cow-dung paste and then he mixes a small quantity of salt and detergent powder to the paste and his process works well to generate electricity.

The village is deprived of electricity and only 2 liters of kerosene oil is distributed per family from the ration stores. In such conditions, the lives of the people of Poorejham village is miserable in the absence of any electricity. Few years ago only pillars for electricity have been installed in the village but no wires or electricity ever came to this village.

Brijesh says he read in the newspaper about the process and he thought of testing the same. When he experimented first the bulb lighted, then he checked it for radio and it worked and next he thought to charge the cellphone and the process worked.

Following Brijesh most of the villagers of Poorejham are producing electricity by his method and making their life easier. Now this formulae of Brijesh has became a hit in his village as well as in most of the nearby villages. Even the children in the village also know the formulae and are happy as they have electricity to carry on their studies.

Villagers are happy and surprised with the experiments that they get some electricity for their daily usage but they don’t know what chemical process goes behind to produce electricity in a mud pot filled with cow-dung and discarded battery cells. They hope when technical people will discover their experiment someday, they will create a better technology using their formulae.

We hope spreading their story can bring a change as well as electricity to their village.

 

 

How one idea can change the future of a child? Here’s a great example set by Biz Divas Foundation

Anusheela Saha (2016 I Inspire Young Trailblazer Awardee) came up with the idea of The #LightBag – A school bag  – with solar panels and LED lights! The bag can turn to a study lamp at night and can charge itself during the day in just 2 hours.

It’s just a simple idea and it’s already changing 1000s of lives.

light bag

Biz Divas Foundation supports Sahpathi in its quest to address learning deficiencies among underprivileged children of Silokhra, an urban village in Gurgaon.

Electricity is a major problem in most Indian villages and across the world due to which many children are forced to drop their dream for education. But this simple idea is proving a boom for these underprivileged children that they can continue their studies even after sunset in the absence of electricity.

We can spread the news and help more people and organizations to contribute for the bright future of these underprivileged children. Organizations can undertake it as a part of their CSR. 

You can also contribute to this bag’s fundraiser here:https://www.bitgiving.com/iinspire16

The cost involved in making one bag, from start to finish is Rs. 1500, including the cost of the solar panel and LED lights.