Tag Archives: Made In India

This genius class 9th dropout scrap dealer’s son can turn scrap / leftover tech parts into a computer.

With enough practice and a good DIY guide, anyone can ‘assemble’ a computer from new parts. But Jayant Parab has fashioned it from parts salvaged from e-waste, and cut the acrylic body himself. He got the know how of repairing computers from his elder brother, who repairs computers.

The 16-year-old, Jayant Parab from Mumbai is comfortable in the solitude of his Ghatkopar house, consumed by his 9-inch computer that he has made from scrap.

“I want to make affordable computers. The computer I have made is from leftovers from offices, banks and hospitals,” he says, pointing to his invention. “The screen is similar to one seen in operation theatres. It’s not a real computer. I used bits and pieces from here and there, and acrylic for the body, which I cut myself. What you see is the first step towards achieving my dream,” says Jayant.

Scrap dealer Ravindra Parab, Jayant’s father who set him on this path | Image Credit: Midday

Jayant had set out on actualising this dream much earlier. As a child, he accompanied his father, then a small-time scrap dealer, in collecting ‘waste’. “He picked up things he thought he could use at home. In Std V, he repaired a laptop that an office had disposed of. That was the time I sort of knew that he would end up in the field of computers,” Ravindra Parab, his father.

Today, Ravindra collects scrap — old and unusable computers, other hardwares from offices, hospitals and schools. “This is how e-waste is generated. Some I sell, some I give for recycling and others I hand over to my son,” says Ravindra, looking fondly at Jayant.

The youngster says the e-waste he gets is usually “as bad as it could get”. “But I try to modify it, by adding new parts and wires. So, it becomes as good as new. If nothing, such computers can be used by families and students who can’t afford to buy a regular one,” claims Jayant.

“He had no interest in studies and that pained me,” says his father. But he was impressed with his son’s vision.

I want to ultimately revolutionise the e-waste industry,” says Jayant. The kid hasn’t given up on education entirely, pursuing Std X via correspondence, while dabbling in ethical hacking and security systems.

India Is Also The Fifth Largest E-Waste Producer!

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This village is producing electricity in a mud pot with the Cow-dung and discarded battery cells. Here’s how?

You would have heard of Bio-gas plant, but here’s a totally different story.

This story is of village Poorejham Tiwari located on the Sultanpur road 5 kms. from Haidergarh town in Barabanki of Uttar Pradesh.

Brijesh Tripathi, a young farmer in village Poorejham, who is just intermediate passed out has invented this new way of producing electricity in a mud pot with cow-dung and discarded battery cells.

He takes cheap Chinese bulbs used in electric welts, and 3 discarded battery cells. He replaces the cover of those discarded cells and connects the positive and negative wires to it and then dip then in three mud pots filled with cow-dung paste and then he mixes a small quantity of salt and detergent powder to the paste and his process works well to generate electricity.

The village is deprived of electricity and only 2 liters of kerosene oil is distributed per family from the ration stores. In such conditions, the lives of the people of Poorejham village is miserable in the absence of any electricity. Few years ago only pillars for electricity have been installed in the village but no wires or electricity ever came to this village.

Brijesh says he read in the newspaper about the process and he thought of testing the same. When he experimented first the bulb lighted, then he checked it for radio and it worked and next he thought to charge the cellphone and the process worked.

Following Brijesh most of the villagers of Poorejham are producing electricity by his method and making their life easier. Now this formulae of Brijesh has became a hit in his village as well as in most of the nearby villages. Even the children in the village also know the formulae and are happy as they have electricity to carry on their studies.

Villagers are happy and surprised with the experiments that they get some electricity for their daily usage but they don’t know what chemical process goes behind to produce electricity in a mud pot filled with cow-dung and discarded battery cells. They hope when technical people will discover their experiment someday, they will create a better technology using their formulae.

We hope spreading their story can bring a change as well as electricity to their village.

 

 

ISRO’s Rocket Science Can Now Pump Blood – Major Make In India Innovation For Heart Transplantation

Spin off of the space technology into an artificial heart (LVAD, a blood pumping device) by Indian Space and Research Organization (ISRO) can now save lives.

In an major Make In India Innovation for the artificial heart a team of ISRO’s Rocket Scientists at Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) have been successful in building a small device that can pump blood while spinning off the material and technology used in rocket science.

A team of about two dozen experts like metallurgists, electronic engineers, flow mechanics and conduction specialists have worked for over six years to build the pump and they describe it as work in progress. The device is a mechanical pump that can be implanted in a person’s chest to assist a weak heart pump blood through the body.

This Made-in-India low cost Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) weighs 100 gm and will help people who need heart transplants, replicating the function of a part of the heart that pumps blood.

The device is made of biocompatible titanium alloy and can pump blood at the rate of 3 to 5 litres per minute. Similar imported heart pumps cost crores of rupees, but the ISRO version is expected to cost only Rs. 1.25 lakh.

See the full story here

It is being tested right now by a team of surgeons on animals and is expected to be ready for use on humans only after a few years of extensive testing. The device was recently tested on five pigs at a hospital in Thiruvananthapuram for a six-hour experiment which doctors said was successful.

“Material used in a rocket, the mechanism used in a rocket, electronics used in a rocket are combined to form the device… which is useful as a first step towards heart transplantation. This device was tested in a pig, and it was found that the pig was alive after fitting it. The other organs of the animal were intact. This shows that it is a very good alternative for an artificial heart,” says Dr K Sivan, Director of the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre in Thiruvananthapuram.


In a paper submitted to an international journal in 2011, a scientist from VSSC said: “LVADs are mechanical circulatory devices placed between the left ventricle and aorta that take over the function of a failing heart either partially or completely.”

An advanced cardiac or heart failure may cause a drop in the output of the heart from its normal resting output of about five litres of blood per minute to around two litres a minute. As the output reaches this level, the kidneys, liver, and brain are damaged irreversibly, the paper reads. The LVAD is designed to pump blood at the rate of 3 to 5 litres per minute.

 “This is one of the examples of how work that is done for rocket technology or satellite technology can help human beings. This is an alternate system in case the human heart has difficulties in pumping blood. It provides a bypass pumping system that can definitely help human lives,” said Dr Kiran Kumar, ISRO chairman.
The titanium used is biocompatible and weighs only 100gm. Other studies show LVADs can be used as an alternative to transplant in case of terminally ill patients whose body condition render them unsuitable for transplants.

 

 

Meet Diwakar Vaish who has many remarkable achievements in the field of Robotics including his latest Robotic Football Team and brain controlled Wheel Chair at just the age 23

Diwakar Vaish is an Indian robotics researcher and Head of Robotics and Research at A-SET Training and Research Institutes. This 23 years old guy is the developer of India’s first completely indigenous 3D printed humanoid robot Manav at just the age 18, India’s first mind controlled robot and robotic football team, and world’s first production brain controlled wheelchair. These technologies and robots were developed at the labs of A-SET Training & Research Institutes.

Manav, the dancing Robot, designed by Diwakar at just age 18:

Here’s the Diwakar’s story at Media

Diwakar has many achievements to his credit and the list goes on here:

  • He is the developer and the mind behind Manav, India’s first completely indigenous 3D printed humanoid robot which can dance and do push-ups.
  • In 2016, he developed the world’s first production brain controlled wheelchair which uses the brain’s electrical impulses to command the wheelchair. It has been developed for patients of Locked In Syndrome (LIS).
  • He is guest lecturer at IIT Roorkee, IIT (BHU), IIT Kanpur, IIT Kharagpur, IIT Bombay, IIT Hyderabad, IIT Guwahati, IIT Bhubaneswar, BITS Pilani, BITS Goa, BIT Mesra, NIT Warangal, NIT Kurukshetra, NIT Surat, IIIT Delhi, IIIT Jabalpur, VIT, Vellore.
  • He is the developer of an Unmanned Ground Vehicle named “Versatile” which has the capability of changing its shape according to the terrain.
  • His work has been recognised by former president of India Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam & Smt. Pratibha Patil.
  • He has delivered two TEDx Talks TEDx Juhu (July 2015) and TEDx IIM Shillong (February 2016).

Diwakar at TedX Juhu

Since then he has not looked back and had been into many mischievous projects including:

  • Making the India’s first fully Autonomous Football playing Humanoid Soccer team.
  • Researching India’s first mind controlled Robot.
  • Lecturering to various top colleges of India which includes 7 IIT’s various NIT’s, BITS, BIT, IIIT, VIT and various other Institutes.

    Made in India 1st mind controlled wheelchair makes movement easy for paralytic patients, designed by Diwakar Vaish at just an age of 23 .

    We wish Diwakar goodluck for all his future endevours and hope many more great achievements coming his way and a revolution in Robotics industry.